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Crime ShortsNews & AlertsUnsolved Crimes

Crime Shorts: Unsolved Homicide (2016) – Emerson Main

Crime Stoppers needs your help identifying the person or persons responsible for the death of 77-year-old Emerson Main from Dawsonville, New Brunswick. On January 9th, 2016 at approximately 12:30 pm, Emerson Main was found deceased by RCMP in his home at 1218 Restigouche River Road – a rural area near the Québec border. The cause…

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Crime Shorts: Catalytic Converter Theft

Catalytic converter theft is rampant in New Brunswick. Thieves crawl under a vehicle and cut the converter free using a tool like a portable angle grinder. SUV’s and pickup trucks are especially at risk as they are higher off the ground. Catalytic converters are a valuable target for thieves because of the precious metals they contain.…

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Crime ShortsLatest NewsUnsolved Crimes

Crime Shorts: Unsolved Homicides in Saint-Quentin, NB (October 2017)

Crime Stoppers needs your help solving the murders of 36-year-old Melanie Roussie and 67-year-old Jean-Paul Caron in Saint-Quentin, NB. On October 30th, 2017, the victims were found dead of gunshot wounds in the home of Jean-Paul Caron at 44 Valcourt Road in Saint-Quentin. Melanie Roussie, mother of three, was originally from Pointe-à-la-Croix, Quebec, but lived…

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Crime Shorts: Illegal garbage and waste dumping

Crime Stoppers, alongside the New Brunswick Department of Justice and Public Safety, needs your help protecting New Brunswick’s wildlife and natural resources from illegal garbage dumping. The chemicals in garbage contaminate soil, wells, and groundwater, and increase the risk of wildfires. Shards of metal and glass can cause serious injuries that require medical attention. Plastic…

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Crime AlertsCrime ShortsUnsolved Crimes

Crime Shorts: Arsons in Cap-Pelé NB

Crime Stoppers needs your help solving the arson of 2 restaurants located on Acadie Drive, in the town of Cap-Pelé in eastern New Brunswick. On November 27, 2019 at 3:00am, firefighters responded to a blaze at the Bel-Air Take Out – its third fire that year. Surveillance video shows an individual with a container, lighting…

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Crime AlertsMissing PersonsUnsolved Crimes

Fredericton Police renew request for assistance to locate Teri-Lynn Wilson

The Fredericton Police Force is seeking additional information from the public regarding the disappearance of 41-year-old Teri-Lynn Wilson. Teri-Lynn last spoke with family on April 13, 2023. Police believe her disappearance to be suspicious and a result of foul play. Teri-Lynn is described as: Fredericton Police File Number: 23-8564 Anyone with information about Teri-Lynn Wilson…

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Crime Shorts: Internet Sextortion

Sextortion is a crime that often targets teenagers, especially teenage boys. Criminals use social media to trick their victims into believing they are communicating with a potential partner, and then persuade them to send explicit pictures or videos of themselves. The offenders extort money by threatening to share these images with the victim’s family and…

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Crime AlertsCrime ShortsUnsolved Crimes

Crime Shorts: Unsolved Homicide – Claire Gagnon

Crime Stoppers needs your help solving the cold case murder of 16-year-old Claire Gagnon from Dieppe NB. Claire was last seen alive on May 24, 1970 between 2:00pm and 3:00pm. She was found dead the next day in a field near her home on Gould Street with a rope around her neck and a towel…

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Crime Shorts: Copper Theft

Copper theft is on the rise in New Brunswick, and it’s costing its victims dearly in time and money. Copper is valuable and commonly used for electrical and telecommunications wires as well as water pipes. Thieves break into buildings and substations to steal any copper they can find, causing damage that is costly to repair. Some thieves…

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Erin Brooks
Crime ShortsLatest NewsMissing PersonsUnsolved Crimes

Fredericton Police continue to investigate disappearance of 38-year-old Erin Brooks

Fredericton Police Force continues to investigate the disappearance of 38-year-old Erin Brooks, who was last seen on Fredericton’s Northside on December 27, 2021. A $65,000 reward is now being offered for information which will lead to finding Erin Brooks. The donor of the funds wishes to remain anonymous. UPDATE – February 03, 2022 : Investigators…

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From FCNB

  • Canadian Securities Administrators urge vigilance against online financial abuse of older Canadians and highlights the importance of a Trusted Contact Person
    by FCNB on 14 June 2024 at 13:17

    Calgary – In recognition of World Elder Abuse Awareness Day, the Canadian Securities Administrators (CSA) is urging older adults, and their loved ones, to remain vigilant in the face of growing online financial elder abuse and to remember the importance of naming a Trusted Contact Person (TCP).  Canadian seniors are being targeted with sophisticated online scams  Older adults can often be the target of financial scams. Scam artists take advantage of those who may be socially isolated or have diminished capacity and who have accumulated savings over time. Advancements in technology, like artificial intelligence (AI), have created new avenues for criminals to exploit these vulnerabilities and deceive victims. AI voice cloning allows scammers to impersonate family members or friends in urgent need of money. AI can also be used to easily manipulate images and videos, known as deepfakes, to create credible personas on dating sites and social media along with fake celebrity endorsement ads. The CSA urges older Canadians to be cautious and offers these tips: Restrict the amount of personal information you share publicly on social media sites by adjusting your privacy settings.  Avoid celebrity or public figure endorsements or investment opportunities promoted online. These are often AI-generated scams.  Be skeptical of new acquaintances or love interests online that take an immediate interest in your finances or offer unrequested investment opportunities, especially involving crypto. Do not send money online to anyone or invest based solely on the advice of someone you have not met in person. Check the registration of any individual, firm or platform you plan to invest with by visiting AreTheyRegistered.ca and confirming the identity of the representative by calling the phone number listed.  Trusted Contact Person: a valuable safeguard Canadians can further protect themselves by assigning a Trusted Contact Person (TCP) to their financial accounts. An appointed TCP gives a financial advisor another resource to turn to if they cannot reach their client, or if they suspect their client may be a victim of financial abuse or fraud. A TCP does not have power of attorney or any access or view into the clients’ accounts at any time. What is a TCP? A TCP is a person you authorize your financial firm to contact in limited circumstances. Why have a TCP? A TCP can be contacted by your registered financial advisor to help you, if needed. Who should have a TCP? A TCP is recommended for anyone who has an investment account, especially older Canadians.  Take action if you think you or someone you know is being taken advantage of financially. A trusted friend, family member, police officer, lawyer, local securities regulator, or staff member at your financial institution can provide guidance.  The CSA also has a number of investor tools and resources available online to help Canadians become more informed investors. Investors can follow @CSA_News on X (formerly Twitter), @CSA.ACVM on Facebook and subscribe to the CSA’s Investor Alerts.   The CSA, the council of the securities regulators of Canada’s provinces and territories, co-ordinates and harmonizes regulation for the Canadian capital markets.    For media inquiries, please contact: Ilana Kelemen Canadian Securities Administrators media@acvm-csa.ca       For investor inquiries, please contact your local securities regulator.

  • Publication of Proposed Guidelines respecting a transfer of assets involving a shared risk plan
    by FCNB on 13 June 2024 at 13:22

    Please be advised that the following document has been uploaded to the Proposed Rules and Changes page on our website:   Notice and Request for Comment: Guidelines respecting a transfer of assets involving a shared risk plan  All submissions should refer to “Guidelines respecting a transfer of assets involving a shared risk plan”. This reference should be included in the subject line if the submission is sent by email.   Comments are to be provided, in writing, no later than August 12, 2024, to:  E-mail: consultation@fcnb.ca  Alternatively, submissions may be sent by mail to:  Pension   Financial and Consumer Services Commission  200-225 King St.   Fredericton, NB E3B 1E1  If you have any questions, please refer them to:  Pension Division, Financial and Consumer Services Commission   Email: pensions-retraite@fcnb.ca  We cannot keep submissions confidential. A summary of the comments received during the comment period may be published. 

  • Empowering professionals to stand up for older and vulnerable clients
    by FCNB on 11 June 2024 at 11:55

    To mark World Elder Abuse Awareness Day (WEAAD), the Financial and Consumer Services Commission (the Commission) is encouraging all New Brunswickers, especially those working in the financial services industry or dealing directly with consumers, to learn more about the financial exploitation of older and vulnerable adults, how to prevent it and what to do if they see it happening. “Industry professionals are in a unique position,” says Marissa Sollows, the Commission’s Director of Communication and Public Affairs. “Because of the interactions they have with their clients and the knowledge they acquire through the client relationship, they may pick up on signs of financial exploitation, vulnerability or diminished mental capacity, before anyone else.” WEAAD is a global event marked each year on June 15 to shine a light on the sad reality of elder abuse and the many ways it affects seniors. Last year, the Commission launched a free on-demand e-learning course to help educate New Brunswickers so they can protect against financial exploitation and financial abuse. The course is intended for those working in the financial sector or dealing directly with consumers, caregivers, older adult support workers, older adults and their family and friends. It is designed to arm these groups with the tools and resources they need to feel empowered to recognize and protect against financial exploitation.  The course is free of charge and can be shared as an organizational-wide learning initiative. Key topics covered are: factors that increase vulnerability scams and schemes targeting older New Brunswickers red flags of financial exploitation and cognitive decline Financial abuse is the most common form of abuse of older adults in Canada, according to the federal government. It is most often perpetrated by someone the victim knows and trusts, like a friend or family member and it has serious impacts on victims beyond just financial harm.  “We all have a role to play in stopping financial exploitation,” says Sollows. “Learning to be vigilant and aware of financial abuse and frauds is vital to protecting older and vulnerable adults. By working together, we are building a financially strong and safe New Brunswick.” In addition to promoting the e-learning course to mark WEAAD, the Commission will share resources on social media throughout June to help New Brunswickers recognize the signs of financial exploitation and to encourage all New Brunswickers to have important financial discussions with the older adults in their lives. Visit Finances50Plus.FCNB.ca for more educational resources.   Audio files of Marissa Sollows, the Commission’s Director of Communications and Public Affairs Quote 1 Quote 2   The Financial and Consumer Services Commission of New Brunswick has the mandate to provide regulatory services that protect the public interest while enhancing public confidence, and to promote understanding of the regulated sectors through educational programs. It is responsible for the administration and enforcement of financial and consumers services legislation for mortgage brokers, payday lenders, real estate, securities, insurance, pensions, credit unions, trust and loan companies, cooperatives, the unclaimed property program, and a wide range of other consumer legislation. It is a Crown corporation funded by the regulatory fees and assessments paid by the regulated sectors. Online educational tools and resources are available at www.fcnb.ca.  

  • Caution: MyCapitalInvest24.co
    by FCNB on 6 June 2024 at 13:22

    The Financial and Consumer Services Commission of New Brunswick (the Commission) is warning New Brunswick investors that the following company is not registered to deal or advise in securities in New Brunswick: Name: MyCapitalInvest24.co Date: June 6, 2024 Address/Location: London, United Kingdom Other Names Used: MyCapitalInvestment24, MyCapitalInvest24Trading URL(s): https://mycapitalinvest24.co/ Learn about how registration protects investors and use the National Registration Search tool to check if an individual or firm is registered with the Commission.   

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